Capitol Hill Mansion Bed & Breakfast Inn

This elegant Richardsonian Romanesque and Queen Anne residence was originally built in 1891 for Jeffrey and Mary Keating. He was a real estate developer and a founder of the McPhee and McGinnity Lumber Company, and she was active in social affairs and charity events. The lot on which the Keating House was constructed was plotted in the late 1860s as part of Porter’s Addition, in the fashionable Capitol Hill neighborhood. During Denver’s silver boom, many of the city’s prominent citizens built grand mansions here. The Keating House was one of the last homes constructed in the neighborhood before the Silver Crash of 1893.

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Cass Mansion

This Dutch Revival home was built for the family of Oscar David Cass, M.D. The land was purchased in 1891, but the house was not finished and occupied until 1899, five years after Dr. Cass died. His wife Emogene and his children (two daughters and a son) lived there until 1918. As with other grand mansions built in the late 1800s, the Cass Mansion is located in Capitol Hill.

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Central Presbyterian Church

Central Presbyterian Church, a Richardsonian Romanesque structure designed by Frank E. Edbrooke in 1892, is the third home for this congregation dating back to 1860.

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Denver Woman’s Press Club / The Burr House

Site description coming soon!

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First Church of Christ, Scientist

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, is an elegant classical gray stone building located at the corner of Logan and 14th Street. It was designed by Ernest Phillip Varian of Varian and Sterner in 1904. The building is an unusually pure example of the Greek Revival style of architecture and has detailing that is reminiscent of ancient Greek temple architecture.

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Governor’s Residence at the Boettcher Mansion

Site description coming soon!

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Humphries Poli Architects

Humphries Poli Architects (HPA), an award-winning firm, moved into 1655 Grant Street, Denver, Col...

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Saint John’s Cathedral

St. John’s Cathedral has deep roots in the history of Denver. It was the first Episcopal congregation, beginning in 1859 and becoming chartered in 1861 as St. John’s in the Wilderness. The early congregations worshiped in several downtown locations before they built their own church in 1880 at 20th and Welton. This structure was destroyed by fire in 1903. Tracy and Swartwout Architects were selected to design the new cathedral at the current site. A chapter house was completed on the site in 1904 and construction of the Gothic Revival cathedral itself began in 1905 and was initially completed in 1911 (History). 

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Scottish Rite Masonic Center

The Scottish Rite Masonic Center has been a part of Colorado history from its earliest period up to the present day. In 1891, the Scottish Rite bodies raised $50,000 to purchase a church at 19th and Welton Streets, but the economic panic of 1893-94 cost many of the members their fortunes and the heavily mortgaged building was lost to foreclosure. In 1909, the lots at East 14th Avenue and Grant Street were purchased, but construction was not authorized until 1922. The Neo-Classical building was completed May 14, 1925, and designed by William Norman Bowman. It is located in Capitol Hill.

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