Black American West Museum & Heritage Center

The Black American West Museum in and of itself is not a single historical place, but a collection of artifacts, photographs and stories of Black Americans who helped settle the west. The museum is housed in the former home of Dr. Justina Ford, Colorado’s first Black woman doctor. The museum is located in Denver’s Five Points neighborhood. Five Points is unique among Denver’s neighborhoods because of the rich contributions of its diverse community, particularly African Americans (Five Points-Whittier Neighborhood History).

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Capitol Hill Mansion Bed & Breakfast Inn

This elegant Richardsonian Romanesque and Queen Anne residence was originally built in 1891 for Jeffrey and Mary Keating. He was a real estate developer and a founder of the McPhee and McGinnity Lumber Company, and she was active in social affairs and charity events. The lot on which the Keating House was constructed was plotted in the late 1860s as part of Porter’s Addition, in the fashionable Capitol Hill neighborhood. During Denver’s silver boom, many of the city’s prominent citizens built grand mansions here. The Keating House was one of the last homes constructed in the neighborhood before the Silver Crash of 1893.

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Cass Mansion

This Dutch Revival home was built for the family of Oscar David Cass, M.D. The land was purchased in 1891, but the house was not finished and occupied until 1899, five years after Dr. Cass died. His wife Emogene and his children (two daughters and a son) lived there until 1918. As with other grand mansions built in the late 1800s, the Cass Mansion is located in Capitol Hill.

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Central Presbyterian Church

Central Presbyterian Church, a Richardsonian Romanesque structure designed by Frank E. Edbrooke in 1892, is the third home for this congregation dating back to 1860.

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Equitable Building

The Equitable Assurance Society of New York built the Equitable Building at the end of the pre-Silver Crash boom, in 1892. The building served as the company’s western office and attracted other financial concerns to 17th Street and the Central Business District. By 1893, it was home for Colorado’s executive offices during construction of the State Capitol. The city’s leading law firms, the First National Bank of Denver and the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad all moved in shortly after the 1893 grand opening. By 1920, the leading stockbrokers were here. People often visited to watch the Equitable Building’s ticker tape (Barlow). 

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Kirk of Highland

Site description coming soon!

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Lumber Baron Inn & Gardens

In 1890, John Mouat built this Queen Anne style mansion for his wife Amelia and their five children. Nestled in the historic neighborhood of the Potter Highlands, which was created and settled by the Scottish in 1863, it is now a charming Bed and Breakfast.

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Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish

Designed by architect Frederick W. Paroth and constructed by contractor Frank Kirchoff, Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, also known as Mount Carmel Italian Catholic Church, was built between 1899 and 1904. The building was listed as a Denver Landmark on August 29, 1977. The red and cream-colored brick Romanesque Revival church dominates the surrounding neighborhood, long acting as the ethnic enclave of Italian tradition. (Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form).

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Overland Cotton Mill / Hercules Industries

The Overland Cotton Mill was built in 1890-91 at the height of Denver’s economic boom. Cotton grown in Texas was shipped by rail north to Denver for processing. During the 13 years it was operating, the mill produced between three and twelve million yards of cloth annually. Most of the production was heavy-duty cotton yardage suitable for making work clothes (Denver Public Library).

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