Bug Theatre

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Byron White U.S. Courthouse

The Byron R. White U.S. Courthouse is an excellent example of Neo-Classical architecture, and is one of downtown Denver’s most notable landmarks. The structure, which originally served as a courthouse and post office, has been described as “a poem in marble.” Its prime location in the historic downtown neighborhood indicates its importance for the government and people of Denver. The imposing structure served as a visual reminder of Denver’s growing economic importance during the early 19th century.

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Denver Woman’s Press Club / The Burr House

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Epworth Building

The Classical Revival Epworth Building, built in 1915, is located in the Curtis Park neighborhood. It included three components: Epworth Methodist Church and the Junius Brown Titsworth Memorial Gymnasium connected by the Epworth Community Center offices. The building was an important part of the community from its construction, providing meals, education, counseling and job referrals.

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Puritan Pie Co.

The Puritan Pie Factory was built for the Senter Pie Company in 1911, and has served as a factory, warehouse and workshop, and is now home to the Rocky Mountain Land Library. The factory is located at 26th and Champa, in the Curtis Park neighborhood. This neighborhood, just to the northeast of downtown Denver, is now called Curtis Park for the city park in its midst and was the creation of the city’s first golden age, that time between 1870, when the railroad came to town, and 1893, when the Silver Crash brought a rude end to Denver’s early prosperity. During that brief period, the rate of Denver’s population growth was higher than that of any other city in the country (Curtis Park).

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Saint John’s Cathedral

St. John’s Cathedral has deep roots in the history of Denver. It was the first Episcopal congregation, beginning in 1859 and becoming chartered in 1861 as St. John’s in the Wilderness. The early congregations worshiped in several downtown locations before they built their own church in 1880 at 20th and Welton. This structure was destroyed by fire in 1903. Tracy and Swartwout Architects were selected to design the new cathedral at the current site. A chapter house was completed on the site in 1904 and construction of the Gothic Revival cathedral itself began in 1905 and was initially completed in 1911 (History). 

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Union Station

Denver’s Union Station has seen many lives. In 1881, the station was built in order to centralize several railroad operation depots, including Union Pacific’s, Denver & Rio Grande Western’s, South Park & Pacific’s and Colorado Central’s. The owners of the original four lines agreed to build a combined station, complete with a central clock tower. In 1914, the larger Great Hall was added. Throughout the 20th century, the building served as a hub for train travel to and from Denver, and in 2014, the entire building was remodeled again. Union Station has served (and still serves) as an anchor for the downtown neighborhood, bringing traffic to the various businesses located there.

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Woodbury Branch Library

The Woodbury Branch Library is among the first of Denver’s Carnegie libraries. These libraries were funded by the industrialist Andrew Carnegie, and were located all around the United States. The Woodbury library was constructed in 1913 in the Renaissance Revival style, and named for Roger Williams Woodbury, a businessman, journalist and banker who served as Denver’s first president of the Chamber of Commerce.

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