Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library

The Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library was built in 2003. This unique branch, named for Elvin Caldwell, the first African American Councilman in District 8, and Omar Blair, the first African American President of the Denver Public School Board, is the only research library of its kind west of the Mississippi. The library replaced the much smaller former Five Points Branch Library. The library is the gateway to Five Points and the Historic District along Welton Street. Five Points is unique among Denver’s neighborhoods because of the rich contributions of its diverse community, particularly African Americans (Five Points-Whittier Neighborhood History).

Read More

Historic Sugar Building

The Sugar Building’s buff brick aesthetic reflects Louis Sullivan’s Chicago style, and was built for the Great Western Sugar Company, an East Coast Company, that was part of the “sugar trust.” It is unusual for the area because it is built of buff-colored brick while almost all of its neighbors and contemporaries are of red brick.

Read More

Saint John’s Cathedral

St. John’s Cathedral has deep roots in the history of Denver. It was the first Episcopal congregation, beginning in 1859 and becoming chartered in 1861 as St. John’s in the Wilderness. The early congregations worshiped in several downtown locations before they built their own church in 1880 at 20th and Welton. This structure was destroyed by fire in 1903. Tracy and Swartwout Architects were selected to design the new cathedral at the current site. A chapter house was completed on the site in 1904 and construction of the Gothic Revival cathedral itself began in 1905 and was initially completed in 1911 (History). 

Read More

Savoy at Curtis Park

The Savoy occupies the second floor of a Victorian building built in 1887 and resides in the historic Curtis Park neighborhood of Denver. The second floor was used as a private social club with a dance floor/social space, lobby and lounge. Today, it remains as one of the few surviving spaces of its kind in the city of Denver.

Read More

SugarCube Building

The SugarCube Building, built in 2008, is named in reference to its historic neighbor, The Sugar Building, home of the Great Western Sugar Company, constructed in 1906. It was designed to fit into the Lower Downtown Historic District with its exterior elements. The SugarCube is a modern ten-story structure; a building-within-a-building, with retail on the first floor, offices on floors two through four and residential apartments on floors five through ten.

Read More