Byers-Evans House

The Byers-Evans House, located in the heart of the Golden Triangle neighborhood, was home to two of early Denver’s most prominent families. The neighborhood is one of the city’s oldest, and its proximity to Denver’s Civic Center made it a very desirable place to live. The house was built for William Byers (1831-1903) and Elizabeth Sumner Byers (1834-1920) in 1883, and sold to William Gray Evans (1855-1924) and Cornelia Lunt Gray Evans (1863-1955) six years later. It now serves as the Byers-Evans House Museum, and the interior of the building hosts a collection of period furniture that is original to the Evans’ tenure in the house. There are only three items in the house that belonged to the Byers, which were donated by their descendants.

Read More

Byron White U.S. Courthouse

The Byron R. White U.S. Courthouse is an excellent example of Neo-Classical architecture, and is one of downtown Denver’s most notable landmarks. The structure, which originally served as a courthouse and post office, has been described as “a poem in marble.” Its prime location in the historic downtown neighborhood indicates its importance for the government and people of Denver. The imposing structure served as a visual reminder of Denver’s growing economic importance during the early 19th century.

Read More

Denver Firefighters Museum

Denver’s original Station One opened January 2, 1882 as home to the Broadway Hose Co. No. 6, which was a volunteer company organized on February 27, 1881. The elaborate building was two stories tall and topped with a belfry that contained a 1600-pound bell. There were two large double doors, one facing 15th Street and one facing Broadway that, according to the Denver Post, were “for the purpose of facilitating the more speedy exit of the men from the engine room, saving them the time and trouble of running around the building.” (Architecture and Museum History). The downtown location meant it was close to prominent civic, private and cultural buildings in need of protection.

Read More

Denver Woman’s Press Club / The Burr House

Site description coming soon!

Read More

Equitable Building

The Equitable Assurance Society of New York built the Equitable Building at the end of the pre-Silver Crash boom, in 1892. The building served as the company’s western office and attracted other financial concerns to 17th Street and the Central Business District. By 1893, it was home for Colorado’s executive offices during construction of the State Capitol. The city’s leading law firms, the First National Bank of Denver and the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad all moved in shortly after the 1893 grand opening. By 1920, the leading stockbrokers were here. People often visited to watch the Equitable Building’s ticker tape (Barlow). 

Read More

Governor’s Residence at the Boettcher Mansion

Site description coming soon!

Read More

Highlands Masonic Temple

The Highlands Masonic Lodge was designed by brothers Merrill and Burnham Hoyt in 1927. It was constructed in the Classical Greek Revival style and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995. The building remains a place where Freemasons and their families can gather as a fraternal family organization. It is now also used as a place for public and private events such as festivals and weddings, and hosts many Masonic groups such as El Jebel Shriners. 

Read More

Historic Sugar Building

The Sugar Building’s buff brick aesthetic reflects Louis Sullivan’s Chicago style, and was built for the Great Western Sugar Company, an East Coast Company, that was part of the “sugar trust.” It is unusual for the area because it is built of buff-colored brick while almost all of its neighbors and contemporaries are of red brick.

Read More

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish

Designed by architect Frederick W. Paroth and constructed by contractor Frank Kirchoff, Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, also known as Mount Carmel Italian Catholic Church, was built between 1899 and 1904. The building was listed as a Denver Landmark on August 29, 1977. The red and cream-colored brick Romanesque Revival church dominates the surrounding neighborhood, long acting as the ethnic enclave of Italian tradition. (Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form).

Read More