Boettcher Concert Hall

Boettcher Concert Hall is the nation’s first concert hall in the round and currently serves as the home of the Colorado Symphony Orchestra. It is designed to place the audience close to the stage in a unique, intimate environment – 80% of the seats are within 65 feet of the stage. The auditorium is located in the Historic Downtown neighborhood, among other prominent government, public and cultural buildings (Noel and Zimmer, 2008).

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Byron White U.S. Courthouse

The Byron R. White U.S. Courthouse is an excellent example of Neo-Classical architecture, and is one of downtown Denver’s most notable landmarks. The structure, which originally served as a courthouse and post office, has been described as “a poem in marble.” Its prime location in the historic downtown neighborhood indicates its importance for the government and people of Denver. The imposing structure served as a visual reminder of Denver’s growing economic importance during the early 19th century.

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Denver Firefighters Museum

Denver’s original Station One opened January 2, 1882 as home to the Broadway Hose Co. No. 6, which was a volunteer company organized on February 27, 1881. The elaborate building was two stories tall and topped with a belfry that contained a 1600-pound bell. There were two large double doors, one facing 15th Street and one facing Broadway that, according to the Denver Post, were “for the purpose of facilitating the more speedy exit of the men from the engine room, saving them the time and trouble of running around the building.” (Architecture and Museum History). The downtown location meant it was close to prominent civic, private and cultural buildings in need of protection.

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Ellie Caulkins Opera House

The Neoclassical Denver Municipal Auditorium was constructed in response to Mayor Robert Speer and other Denver boosters’ desire for a large auditorium, as early as 1899, when voters approved a $400,000 bond for its construction. It took another bond issue in 1904 and much argument over location before the cornerstone was laid in 1907. The official opening was July 5, 1908. The auditorium was located in the historic downtown neighborhood, among other prominent government, public and cultural buildings (Noel and Zimmer, 2008).

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Equitable Building

The Equitable Assurance Society of New York built the Equitable Building at the end of the pre-Silver Crash boom, in 1892. The building served as the company’s western office and attracted other financial concerns to 17th Street and the Central Business District. By 1893, it was home for Colorado’s executive offices during construction of the State Capitol. The city’s leading law firms, the First National Bank of Denver and the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad all moved in shortly after the 1893 grand opening. By 1920, the leading stockbrokers were here. People often visited to watch the Equitable Building’s ticker tape (Barlow). 

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Trinity United Methodist Church

Designed by Robert Roeschlaub, Colorado’s first licensed architect, the Trinity Methodist Church is a splendid example of the Gothic Revival style or “Modern Gothic.” What made the building “modern” in 1888, when it was designed and built, was the marriage of Gothic detailing and a Rococo theater with the latest technology. The church is located in the heart of downtown Denver, surrounded by skyscrapers on every side, multi-story parking garages, busy streets and pay-to-park lots.

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