Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish

Designed by architect Frederick W. Paroth and constructed by contractor Frank Kirchoff, Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, also known as Mount Carmel Italian Catholic Church, was built between 1899 and 1904. The building was listed as a Denver Landmark on August 29, 1977. The red and cream-colored brick Romanesque Revival church dominates the surrounding neighborhood, long acting as the ethnic enclave of Italian tradition. (Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form).

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Sanctuary Downtown

The 1921 Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist embodies the distinctive characteristics of the Italian Renaissance Revival style, with Classical Revival influences, as executed by two master Denver architects, Burnham F. Hoyt and Merrill H. Hoyt of the firm Hoyt and Hoyt.

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St. Patrick’s Oratory

This Spanish Colonial Revival style mission church, designed by the Denver architectural firm of Wagner and Manning, was begun in 1907 and completed in 1910. At the time of its construction, the Mission style was considered unusual in the city of Denver, although reflective of its Western character. It was the second church to serve St. Patrick’s parish, which was the first Roman Catholic parish established west of the South Platte River in 1881. The church served both the working class of the Platte River Valley and the upper middle-class professionals of the Highlands neighborhood (St. Patrick’s Oratory National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form).

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Woodbury Branch Library

The Woodbury Branch Library is among the first of Denver’s Carnegie libraries. These libraries were funded by the industrialist Andrew Carnegie, and were located all around the United States. The Woodbury library was constructed in 1913 in the Renaissance Revival style, and named for Roger Williams Woodbury, a businessman, journalist and banker who served as Denver’s first president of the Chamber of Commerce.

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