Ellie Caulkins Opera House

The Neoclassical Denver Municipal Auditorium was constructed in response to Mayor Robert Speer and other Denver boosters’ desire for a large auditorium, as early as 1899, when voters approved a $400,000 bond for its construction. It took another bond issue in 1904 and much argument over location before the cornerstone was laid in 1907. The official opening was July 5, 1908. The auditorium was located in the historic downtown neighborhood, among other prominent government, public and cultural buildings (Noel and Zimmer, 2008).

Read More

Historic Sugar Building

The Sugar Building’s buff brick aesthetic reflects Louis Sullivan’s Chicago style, and was built for the Great Western Sugar Company, an East Coast Company, that was part of the “sugar trust.” It is unusual for the area because it is built of buff-colored brick while almost all of its neighbors and contemporaries are of red brick.

Read More

Kirk of Highland

Site description coming soon!

Read More

Montclair Civic Building

The Molkery, also spelled “Molkerie,” is German for Milk House, and was constructed circa 1888 by Baron Von Richthofen as part of his estate in the Montclair neighborhood, five miles east of Denver. It was built as a dairy barn, restaurant and hotel promoting healthy living while serving as one of the original tuberculosis facilities in Colorado until 1893. The land making up the Montclair neighborhood was purchased in 1885, and originally developed as a small suburban community east of Denver. Its co-founders were Matthias P. Cochrane, who originally came from Montclair, New Jersey, and named the new community in its honor, as well as Baron Walter von Richthofen, a German nobleman (The Montclair Neighborhood). 

Read More

RedLine Contemporary Art Center

The RedLine Arts Building contributes to the revitalization of a declining warehouse district immediately north of the Downtown City Center. The building encourages art and creative endeavors and boasts a community service-centered mission. It offers a contemporary architectural appearance that provides the neighborhood with a pleasing new look that reimagines the past industrial vernacular. RedLine was purposely built in the Five Points neighborhood in order to help revitalize the neighborhood by fostering services for the immediate community and counteracting past neglect and displacement of the area’s residents.   

Read More

Sanctuary Downtown

The 1921 Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist embodies the distinctive characteristics of the Italian Renaissance Revival style, with Classical Revival influences, as executed by two master Denver architects, Burnham F. Hoyt and Merrill H. Hoyt of the firm Hoyt and Hoyt.

Read More

Woodbury Branch Library

The Woodbury Branch Library is among the first of Denver’s Carnegie libraries. These libraries were funded by the industrialist Andrew Carnegie, and were located all around the United States. The Woodbury library was constructed in 1913 in the Renaissance Revival style, and named for Roger Williams Woodbury, a businessman, journalist and banker who served as Denver’s first president of the Chamber of Commerce.

Read More