Cleo Parker Robinson Dance

Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble was founded by Cleo Parker Robinson in 1970, and has called the former Shorter Community AME Church home since the 1980s.

Read More

Dairy Block

The Dairy Block is nestled between two historic buildings, and takes its name to honor the historic Windsor Dairy Building on the corner of 19th and Blake. Architects Fisher and Fisher constructed the Windsor Dairy in 1916, and its style is 20th century commercial. Dairy Block is a mixed-use office, retail and hospitality development spanning the block bounded by Blake, Wazee, 18th and 19th streets in Lower Downtown Denver. The project opened in the spring of 2017 and features 250,000 square feet of office space, 60,000 square feet of retail and 394 belowground parking spaces. Conjoined with the adjacent steel office building at the lobby level, the design of the hotel complements the industrial history of the lower downtown neighborhood while introducing a refreshed and refined aesthetic. 

Read More

Ebert Elementary School

Site description coming soon!

Read More

Highlands Church at the Holiday Theater

This storefront building opened in 1914 and was originally called The Egyptian Theater, named because of its Egyptian Revival design. The building has lived many lives—as a theater, shop, restaurant, and now, as Highlands Church. It is located, as its name suggests, in the Highlands.

Read More

Highlands Masonic Temple

The Highlands Masonic Lodge was designed by brothers Merrill and Burnham Hoyt in 1927. It was constructed in the Classical Greek Revival style and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995. The building remains a place where Freemasons and their families can gather as a fraternal family organization. It is now also used as a place for public and private events such as festivals and weddings, and hosts many Masonic groups such as El Jebel Shriners. 

Read More

Highlands United Methodist Church

Highlands United Methodist Church, a simplified Gothic Revival building at 32nd and Osceola, has served the neighborhood since its opening in 1922. As the name suggests, it is located in the Highlands neighborhood.

Read More

Sanctuary Downtown

The 1921 Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist embodies the distinctive characteristics of the Italian Renaissance Revival style, with Classical Revival influences, as executed by two master Denver architects, Burnham F. Hoyt and Merrill H. Hoyt of the firm Hoyt and Hoyt.

Read More

Scottish Rite Masonic Center

The Scottish Rite Masonic Center has been a part of Colorado history from its earliest period up to the present day. In 1891, the Scottish Rite bodies raised $50,000 to purchase a church at 19th and Welton Streets, but the economic panic of 1893-94 cost many of the members their fortunes and the heavily mortgaged building was lost to foreclosure. In 1909, the lots at East 14th Avenue and Grant Street were purchased, but construction was not authorized until 1922. The Neo-Classical building was completed May 14, 1925, and designed by William Norman Bowman. It is located in Capitol Hill.

Read More

St. Cajetan’s Center

St. Cajetan’s Church, designed in the Spanish Colonial style by architect Robert Willison, was completed in 1926 to serve the Auraria neighborhood’s Hispanic population. Auraria is the oldest continuously occupied neighborhood in Denver, with the buildings now occupied with campus offices. In the early 1900’s, Hispanics from Southern Colorado and New Mexico began to settle in the neighborhood, primarily attending church at either St. Elizabeth’s, a predominantly German Parish at the time, or St. Leo’s, a predominantly Irish Parish at the time. In the 1920’s, the congregation submitted a petition to the Bishop requesting a Hispanic Parish. In 1922, Hispanic masses began in the basement of St. Leo’s. As the Hispanic population increased, the congregation participating in these masses grew steadily and the desire for their own church increased (St. Cajetan’s Church State Historical Fund Grant Application).

Read More