Airedale Building – Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox & Hostel Fish

The Koppers Airedale Building, a Queen Anne style saloon and hotel built by Albert Koppers and his wife in 1889, has been in almost continuous use since its construction.

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Black American West Museum & Heritage Center

The Black American West Museum in and of itself is not a single historical place, but a collection of artifacts, photographs and stories of Black Americans who helped settle the west. The museum is housed in the former home of Dr. Justina Ford, Colorado’s first Black woman doctor. The museum is located in Denver’s Five Points neighborhood. Five Points is unique among Denver’s neighborhoods because of the rich contributions of its diverse community, particularly African Americans (Five Points-Whittier Neighborhood History).

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Boettcher Concert Hall

Boettcher Concert Hall is the nation’s first concert hall in the round and currently serves as the home of the Colorado Symphony Orchestra. It is designed to place the audience close to the stage in a unique, intimate environment – 80% of the seats are within 65 feet of the stage. The auditorium is located in the Historic Downtown neighborhood, among other prominent government, public and cultural buildings (Noel and Zimmer, 2008).

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Bryant Webster Elementary School

Bryant-Webster Elementary School, built in 1931 by J. Roger and G. Meredith Musick in the rare “Pueblo Deco” style, is one of Denver’s finest examples of Art Deco architectural design.

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Byers-Evans House

The Byers-Evans House, located in the heart of the Golden Triangle neighborhood, was home to two of early Denver’s most prominent families. The neighborhood is one of the city’s oldest, and its proximity to Denver’s Civic Center made it a very desirable place to live. The house was built for William Byers (1831-1903) and Elizabeth Sumner Byers (1834-1920) in 1883, and sold to William Gray Evans (1855-1924) and Cornelia Lunt Gray Evans (1863-1955) six years later. It now serves as the Byers-Evans House Museum, and the interior of the building hosts a collection of period furniture that is original to the Evans’ tenure in the house. There are only three items in the house that belonged to the Byers, which were donated by their descendants.

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Capitol Hill Mansion Bed & Breakfast Inn

This elegant Richardsonian Romanesque and Queen Anne residence was originally built in 1891 for Jeffrey and Mary Keating. He was a real estate developer and a founder of the McPhee and McGinnity Lumber Company, and she was active in social affairs and charity events. The lot on which the Keating House was constructed was plotted in the late 1860s as part of Porter’s Addition, in the fashionable Capitol Hill neighborhood. During Denver’s silver boom, many of the city’s prominent citizens built grand mansions here. The Keating House was one of the last homes constructed in the neighborhood before the Silver Crash of 1893.

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Cass Mansion

This Dutch Revival home was built for the family of Oscar David Cass, M.D. The land was purchased in 1891, but the house was not finished and occupied until 1899, five years after Dr. Cass died. His wife Emogene and his children (two daughters and a son) lived there until 1918. As with other grand mansions built in the late 1800s, the Cass Mansion is located in Capitol Hill.

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Cleo Parker Robinson Dance

Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble was founded by Cleo Parker Robinson in 1970, and has called the former Shorter Community AME Church home since the 1980s.

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Dairy Block

The Dairy Block is nestled between two historic buildings, and takes its name to honor the historic Windsor Dairy Building on the corner of 19th and Blake. Architects Fisher and Fisher constructed the Windsor Dairy in 1916, and its style is 20th century commercial. Dairy Block is a mixed-use office, retail and hospitality development spanning the block bounded by Blake, Wazee, 18th and 19th streets in Lower Downtown Denver. The project opened in the spring of 2017 and features 250,000 square feet of office space, 60,000 square feet of retail and 394 belowground parking spaces. Conjoined with the adjacent steel office building at the lobby level, the design of the hotel complements the industrial history of the lower downtown neighborhood while introducing a refreshed and refined aesthetic. 

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