Confluence Denver

Rising high at 2166 15th Street in Denver is The Confluence, an ultra-luxury, 34-story, 288-unit apartment community, aptly named because of its unique location at the confluence of Cherry Creek and the South Platte River. The three-building lineup of high-rise, low-rise and mid-rise is a mix of curves, glass, metal and masonry designed by GDA architects, and opened in 2017.

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Dairy Block

The Dairy Block is nestled between two historic buildings, and takes its name to honor the historic Windsor Dairy Building on the corner of 19th and Blake. Architects Fisher and Fisher constructed the Windsor Dairy in 1916, and its style is 20th century commercial. Dairy Block is a mixed-use office, retail and hospitality development spanning the block bounded by Blake, Wazee, 18th and 19th streets in Lower Downtown Denver. The project opened in the spring of 2017 and features 250,000 square feet of office space, 60,000 square feet of retail and 394 belowground parking spaces. Conjoined with the adjacent steel office building at the lobby level, the design of the hotel complements the industrial history of the lower downtown neighborhood while introducing a refreshed and refined aesthetic. 

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Gensler

Gensler’s Denver Office, designed by Gensler in 2015, focused on the goal of creating the best place to work in Denver. “Our space sets the new standard in Denver for a creative, collaborative work environment, enhancing our ability to innovate and deliver outstanding service to our clients,” according to Jon Gambrill, Principal + Managing Director. Gensler’s team of designers collectively embraced the challenge to celebrate their culture of innovation. The new Gensler office covers two floors and features a variety of environments designed to promote connectivity, choice of work environment and well-being.

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Historic Sugar Building

The Sugar Building’s buff brick aesthetic reflects Louis Sullivan’s Chicago style, and was built for the Great Western Sugar Company, an East Coast Company, that was part of the “sugar trust.” It is unusual for the area because it is built of buff-colored brick while almost all of its neighbors and contemporaries are of red brick.

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Rockmount Building

The Rockmount Building is considered to be “Prairie Style” and was designed by Fisher & Fisher, one of the finest architectural firms in Denver. The building was constructed as a warehouse with fully fired brick throughout, in addition to heavy timber that far exceeded structural requirements.

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SugarCube Building

The SugarCube Building, built in 2008, is named in reference to its historic neighbor, The Sugar Building, home of the Great Western Sugar Company, constructed in 1906. It was designed to fit into the Lower Downtown Historic District with its exterior elements. The SugarCube is a modern ten-story structure; a building-within-a-building, with retail on the first floor, offices on floors two through four and residential apartments on floors five through ten.

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Union Station

Denver’s Union Station has seen many lives. In 1881, the station was built in order to centralize several railroad operation depots, including Union Pacific’s, Denver & Rio Grande Western’s, South Park & Pacific’s and Colorado Central’s. The owners of the original four lines agreed to build a combined station, complete with a central clock tower. In 1914, the larger Great Hall was added. Throughout the 20th century, the building served as a hub for train travel to and from Denver, and in 2014, the entire building was remodeled again. Union Station has served (and still serves) as an anchor for the downtown neighborhood, bringing traffic to the various businesses located there.

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